Wednesday, February 4, 2009

Einstein's Folly, Part II

After his expulsion from school, Einstein also had a two-year stint as a first-chair violin playing with the London Symphony Orchestra under Maestro Sir Neville Mariner. Even in this dignified setting, Einstein's antics abounded. He would improvise musical embellishments, often from other songs, into the music he was playing, and he played when he should have been resting. He simply couldn't stick to the score.

Therein lies my fascination with Albert Einstein. This quirky comedian with unruly hair and rumpled clothes couldn't stick to the “score.” While this wouldn't serve him well in an orchestra, I thought it was a smashing tribute to a man whose early life gave little evidence of his sprawling genius or the destiny he would fulfill. Thinking outside the box, being open to new possibilities, and seeing fresh ideas through new eyes served him well, this man who fundamentally changed the way we see our physical world.

He experienced so much, followed his heart and dreams, ignored critics, and retained his sense of humor. What wonderful lessons for us. One of the many wise things Einstein said was, “There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” I choose to believe he was not speaking solely of things scientific. And so this has become my mantra, as well, as I stray occasionally from my “score” to discover more about myself and life.


17 comments:

High Desert Diva said...

I've never heard anything about him being a musician.

Thanks for this post.

Peggy said...

Diva, I've heard it said that there's a close link between music and math aptitude. While that's not true in my case, apparently it was in Mr. Einstein's!

Joanne said...

I didn't know he was a musician, either. But I'm not surprised! What a wonderful example he set of a life well lived.

Poetikat said...

I changed my mind (see comment in previous post) I think he was a closet-Marx Brother!

Kat

Speaking of comical, my word verification is "sutpoo". Ha ha ha ha ha.... "poo" always gives me the giggles.

Peggy said...

Kat, your comments make me smile (and sometimes guffaw!). I agree, there seems to be some of that wacky physical comedy in so many of Einstein's pranks; so Marx Brother-like! I'll bet "poo" gave Einstein the giggles too! Who knew you had so much in common with him??!

Poetikat said...

Not the brainy part, sadly.

Kat

willow said...

Good thing he strayed from the score, so to speak, isn't it? We all should now and then.

Peggy said...

I don't know about that, Kat. :-D

Willow, it's so true. I love the fact that Einstein was always true to himself no matter what he was doing. So unconventional in so many ways.

neetzy said...

I loved both Einstein posts! I knew he had school troubles and was a bit of a renegade, but I never knew he played violin! To make first chair in the London Symphony is no small feat for a part-time "fiddler". Thanks so much for sharing this!

Peggy said...

Neetzy, it's great to see you again! I'm so glad you liked the Einstein posts. He's near and dear to my heart; it's great to know other's appreciate him, too.

dancing doc design said...

love,love,love these posts about Albert!
Some years ago,when I was plowing through the basic premedical curriculum, I enticed myself into learning about the physical world represented by mathematical formulas - by reading about the lives the scientists ---Einstein was truly one of my favorites-quirky, creative, impulsive and bold, full of genuine enthusiasm which is still contagious!! thanks for prompting me to revisit this memory.

Peggy said...

Dancing Doc, thanks for stopping by! I'm so glad you enjoyed these Einstein moments!

steviewren said...

Peggy, I can see that I don't know enough about this fascinating man. People are so interestingly complex. None of us are ever just what we seem at first glance.

These two posts made me think about how we want to medicate "differentness" out of our school age children. Every parent should read about Einstein and be comforted to know they may just have an Einstein on their hands.

Barry said...

Excellent Peggy. All I've read about Einstein was of him working in the post office.

Obviously he was a man of many talents. I've really enjoyed these two posts which have revolutionized the way I think about one of the most important figures of the last century.

Sydney said...

My Hero, in many ways.

I had no idea bout the violin. How did I miss that?

He makes my hair look good, lol.

Peggy said...

Steviewren, I agree wholeheartedly. There was almost nothing in Einstein's childhood to indicate that he was anything other than a toublemaker. He couldn't even form sentences until he was nine years old. He was a copious paste-eater and, of course, we know about his proclivity toward pilfering! I'm betting his parents lived at the end of their proverbial rope!

Peggy said...

Barry, learning more about men like Einstein make them richer and deeper, doesn't it? I find him one of the more fascinating characters I've read about.

Sydney, his hair makes EVERYBODY'S hair look good! Yikes!